Holy Water.

Most of us enjoy water in all its forms. Fresh rain, the ocean, rivers and streams. But, we don’t always realise the power that this element holds.

The first medicine I learned to make as a twasa (initiate) was holy water. The nature and energy of water lends itself to being an exceptional healer, transmitter and holder of energies and intent. A lot has been studied and written about the properties and consciousness of water by Dr. Masaru Emoto. You can do some further reading about this amazing element. Water is also a very good healer for us as we are made of 60% water.

Holy water is used to clean, bless and heal. It was a daily ritual to make blessed water in the mornings and then clean the makosini or ancestors house and sprinkle it with Holy water, as well as the yard. A bucket of blessed water, covered with a white cloth is always in the makosini, ready for use.

Holy water is also used to “dress” or bless candles or ceremonial items. This is also done in other traditions such as West African and Caribbean. Any person or item can be blessed and consecrated by sprinkling it or dipping it into holy water.

When using holy water for healing it can be done in a number of ways. The sick person can be given holy water to drink in small quantities at intervals while they are being treated or recovering. A sick person can also be sprinkled with Holy Water to protect them against further negative energies. Holy water is also used in exorcism or clearing out bad spirits in homes.

Blessed water is also used for preparing muthi or medicine. Before we cook any medicine we bless the water in the pot. When water is collected for washing or steaming a patient, the water is blessed before it is used.

Preparing Holy water:

I was taught in this way how to bless water. It can be done in many different ways. Place the water you want to bless in a clean bucket. Take 10 matches. Light them all at the same time and drop them into the water while they are still burning. Start to pray over the water and ask for the Holy Spirit of all things and the holy spirit of the water, to awaken and bless the water. The fire symbolises the spirit of the water and awakens the water. While you are praying you can also add a silver coin or hold a silver cross in the water. Make sure you only speak positive words of love, healing and power into the water, as the water will accept what you put into it and transmit it to any person or object it touches.

Some water is naturally more “awake” than other water and can be used to awaken water that is stale – like tap water. This is natural water like sea water or unpolluted water from sacred springs or rivers, waterfalls and rain water.Drops of these waters can also be added to bless water, or can be used by itself as healing water. Pray over it and ask it to do the work you want it to do.

Various ceremonies and rituals are performed using water, such as ceremonies at rivers, waterfalls, the ocean, washing, steaming and baptisms. I will write more about this in a next post.

Water represents our emotions. It also teaches us to flow and be flexible. If our emotions are out of balance we have to balance this water element within ourselves, we can also use it to remove bad energies, heavy thoughts and illness from us, by allowing the flow of water to take it away from us. You can do this practise by standing under running water or sitting in flowing water and asking the water and the water ancestors to remove everything that is causing you trouble and what you do not want. Remember to thank the water and the ancestors after the ritual.

Thokoza. Thank You for reading my blog. Please contact me if you want to give feedback or have a question.

 

 

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